Ransomware is Out, Cryptojacking is In

Cryptojacking attacks increased with an astonishing 8,500% in 2017 all because of the sudden increase of the cryptocurrency values. We are worried because of the 44,000% increase in coin-miner detections.
These miners represent a big cybersecurity problem because they are employing a low barrier to entry and only requiring a couple of lines of code to operate. Cybercriminals are using them to steal processing power and cloud CPU from consumers and enterprises to mine cryptocurrency. Miners are very dangerous cybersecurity problems because they can slow devices, overheat batteries, and in some cases, render devices unusable. For companies, miners can put corporate networks at risk of shutdown and inflate cloud CPU usage, adding cost.

To stay away from such threats, we recommend the install of antivirus for Windows or antivirus for Mac in every device that you own, depending on which OS your device is running.
If you are a company, it is also recommended to hire every year a specialized cybersecurity company that will run annual tests on your company’s network. These tests include penetration testing and ethical hacking tests; they are essential because an infection that uses malware coin miners is hazardous for every company.
We also found a 600% increase in overall IoT attacks in 2017; this means that hackers can exploit the connected nature of these devices to mine en masse.

A couple of weeks ago an Annual Threat Report showed a reduced ransomware use in 2017. Hackers have shifted their focus to crypto mining as an alternative to cash in while cryptocurrency values are high.
For example last year, the average ransom demand dropped to $522, less than half the average of the year prior. Even the number of ransomware variants increased by 46%, the number of ransomware families dropped, suggesting that hackers are innovating less in ransom sector and they have shifted their focus to new, higher value targets.

The report is based on 700,000 global adversaries, records from 98 million attack sensors worldwide and monitors threat activities in over 157 countries and territories.
Threats in the mobile space, including the number of new mobile malware variants increased by 54% in 2017. An average of 24,000 malicious mobile applications was detected each day last year.
Grayware apps that aren’t entirely malicious but can be troublesome by leaking the device’s phone, for example, are also up to 63% and unfortunately, this cybersecurity problem will not be going away anytime soon.
Remember to use an antivirus for Windows or antivirus for Mac in every device that you own, depending on which OS your machine is running,
If you are a company we recommend to hire every year a specialized cybersecurity company that will run annual tests on your company’s network, tests like this include: penetration testing and ethical hacking.